Līgo Haībun Challenge – Weather forecast for tonight: dark.

Okay, so the only link between the title and the Līgo Haībun is that I have chosen the George Carlin quote. Each week, with the Līgo Haībun we are given a choice of one of two photos, a choice of two words or a choice of two quotes. Unfortunately, with it being my mum’s 70th birthday this week, I missed last week’s Līgo Haībun and I decided I was not going to miss this week’s challenge.

There are two judges on the Līgo Haībun Challenge, Ese and Managua Gunn. The two quotes they have given us to choose from are:

“And then there are the times when the
wolves are silent and the
moon is howling.”
George Carlin

“Perfect order is the forerunner
of perfect horror.”
Carlos Fuentes

Shutter Speed 800 ISO 400

The Howling Moon

Life goes on regardless of anything around you, anything seen, and anything unseen. Life picks you up as you stumble. You can falter as you go along, but with friends, they will pick you up. Things can happen, but your friends will be there for you.

Everybody knows that there are times that you WILL fail. It is one of the major problems with life: Failure. However, without failure, how do you expect the successes to be overwhelming? The best way to overcome the failure is with our friends to be there for us.

The majority of us have people who will be there the moment we fall. They are helping us before we even hit the ground. They are helping us up when we think we are still falling; hands that grab for us to save us. These friends are the ones who mean a lot to us. They are the ones who are there by choice.

And then there are times when the wolves are silent, and the moon is howling. The times when there is no one there to catch us when we fall. The times that no one can hear our cries, but it does not mean they are not near; it does not mean they are not coming; it does not mean you will always be alone. It does not mean you will be on the floor for long.

Our friends help us
not only in our time of need
but also in times of fun 

 

 

Memories – A Haibun

The Līgo Haībun Challenge is a weekly challenge where you choose something to create a post from. Whether it is fiction, a poem or something dear to you. It is a two-part post that is one part as I have just mentioned and the second part is where you finish with a haiku style poem. Each week, there is either two photos to choose one of; two quotes to choose one of; or two words to choose one of. This week it is two photos – “Two swings in the snow” by Ye Pirate, and “A view of grass from below” by Penny. I have chosen the swings. This brought back a memory of when I was a child of nine or ten. Every time it snowed enough, we grabbed cardboard boxes, old blankets, bread crates, anything that could be sat on and ran for one of the steepest hills. There is a photo of the hill at the bottom.

© Ye Pirate

© Ye Pirate

The snow fell as tiny flakes. Each unique, each telling a story of its own, each with its own arms attempting to grab hold of the one falling by its side. I grabbed the cardboard box and I ran to catch up with my friends. To our small legs, it seemed a long way to walk or run, but with the snow, we knew the walk ended in joy and fun.

Running up the road always hurt the chest. Always made the legs ache. Always made the eyes water as the road led up a steep incline. At the top, the road led down and through a tunnel. We ran screaming through, shrieking, and our sounds reverberating off four walls.

Emerging from the tunnel and the hardest part of the journey now lay ahead of us in the form of a steep hill. Running from side to side, making our way up so we did not use all of our strength in one go, but each wanting to be the first.

The top of the hill felt like a playground to us, with the cardboard being our swings, the breadbaskets our seesaws. The far side beckoned us children. The youngest – eight years old, the eldest – thirteen. Then the yelling as we ran and leapt onto our chosen sleds, hurtling down the side of the hill faster than we had ever travelled before.

children in winter
speeding down hills in the snow
then climbing to repeat 

Sugarloaf Hill Folkestone UK

Sugarloaf Hill
Folkestone
UK

Līgo Haībun Challenge – Flying High

The Līgo Haībun Challenge is a weekly challenge where you choose something to create a post from. Whether it is fiction, a poem or something dear to you. It is a two part post that is one part as I have just mentioned and the second part is where you finish with a haiku style poem. Each week, there is either two photos to choose one of; two quotes to choose one of; or two words to choose one of. This week, it is two words. Torture and Fascination. I chose the latter because of how I find birds to be such wondrous creatures.

You can find more information at the home of the judges:

Call 2 Read ………………… The Why About This ………………… Ye Pirate

The wings of birds hold aloft
Strength in muscles
Gracefully beating against the air
Twisting
Weaving
Soaring
Beating
Gliding

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Feathers ruffle; wings outstretched
Beaks open taking air
Gliding above trees, houses
Watching
Seeing
Waiting
Breathing
Floating

October 06 2013

Eyes dart left to right, side to side
Seeing far off sights
Wings fold back as food is seen
Diving
Hurtling
Speeding
Grasping
Feeding

August 25 2013

 fascinating birds
with wings so strong
and eyes so sharp

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Līgo Haībun Challenge – Nature’s Admiral

Every week, Padmini, Penny and Pirate host the Līgo Haībun Challenge. If you wish to know what this entails, I urge you to visit one of their blogs to have a look and join in if you can. This week’s challenge is a choice of two quotes.

The butterfly counts not months but moments, and has time enough
Rabindranath Tagore

or

The world is mud-luscious and puddle-wonderful
E.E. Cummings

I chose Tagore’s quote for mine.

Nature’s Admiral

The cocoon moved slightly, showing that something was attempting to break free, the metamorphosis complete. A crack appeared on the side, a small fragment fell away, giving air to the creature inside. A small leg emerged and then shrunk back inside as if the outside were some poisonous vapour. Another fragment fell away, this one larger than the last and causing more of a crack to wind its way up the side of the chrysalis. Now the complete bottom of the cocoon fell away and a head poked out, followed by a pair of legs and an antenna springing forwards. The creature crawled its way out, dragging a pair of heavy wings behind it. Holding on with as much energy as it could muster at this time, it rested with the dead weight of the wings pulling it down.

The creature knew it did not have long, time marched ever forward with darkness not far away, and ending the first day. After what seemed like forever to the creature, it struggled to move the wings. Pulsing blood through the veins, moving them faster after each moment, the creature’s excitement grew at the prospect of seeing new places from a different vantage point. The wings moved faster and faster, then the creature let go … falling … it turned around as it fell and then flapped its wings and flew.

The beautiful butterfly looked around at the surroundings. The vibrant colours; the scent of leaves; the sound of other butterflies floating, coming near him, looking at his markings with awe as he floated on the air, commanding the very space he occupied. Every moment the butterfly existed, it knew it gave the world something to lift the spirits of living beings.

the red admiral
immortalised by camera
shows nature’s beauty

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